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in mississippi. >> we can do 400,000. >> reporter: 400,000 in one day? >> pounds, yes. >> that is a lot of fish. >> that is a lot of fish. >> reporter: he's one of the biggest catfish processors in the country and one of the driving forces for getting the u.s. department of agriculture to inspect catfish grown here and imported. critics call that a huge waste of taxpayer money. there is one big problem. >> you already have the fda inspecting seafood. >> that's not correct. we have fda but that's a nonexistent inspection. >> reporter: believe it or not, two federal agencies are supposed to inspect the same fish. the usda spent $20 million just for planning those inspections. while there have been concerns about the adequacy of inspections of imported fish in the past, do we need usda inspection, too? >> we would say there is food safety concern. >> no. a catfish is a catfish is a catfish. it's a safe food. >> reporter: david acheson is one of the country's foremost food safety experts who says catfish is not a high risk food and the fda should continue to be in charge of inspecting it. >> the on
nation may be more divided than back then. i am from mississippi. my father worked heavily to desegregate schools in mississippi. my mother did not have a black high school, my about father had to build it. lori: as reverend jesse jack jackson pointed out, african-americans are freer but less equal. >> that does reflect my sentiment. unemployment in black community is on the increase. we -- >> 12-point 6%. black unemployment. versus 6.6, reverend. >> it is not just a black problem. there are disparities in other communities, they have benefitted by that movement. i think all of us have to get engaged. not just a government problem. that is a key point president obama mentioned. everyone has to get involved am 73% of children born out of wedlock that is the government, some individuals need to hear what is happening at their children, in living rooms, men and women need to take responsibility. >> lori, reverend is right, government is supposed to protect the consumer, but up to individual responsibility, "it takes a village" to raise a child. with everything going on in the communities, we
a century in the making. edith hill cannon grew up in the '60s in mississippi. >> as much as my parents tried to protect me, you couldn't escape discrimination. >> reporter: do you ever forget the discrimination? >> uh-huh. no. >> reporter: she listened to a who's who of celebrities and politicians including the daughters of two presidents, lynda johnson robb and caroline kennedy and two former presidents, jimmy carter and bill clinton. >> this march and that speech changed america. they opened minds, they melted hearts and they moved millions. >> reporter: the event included a recreation of the 1963 march through the streets of washington that ended at the lincoln memorial. setting up a nearly five-hour program under cloudy skies and periodic rain. congressman john lewis returned today, the only speaker here to share the stage in 1963 with dr. king. >> this moment in our history has been a long time coming but a change has come. >> reporter: bill tate says he was here, too, 50 years ago. that day when dr. king made that speech, what were you thinking then? >> i knew we were in a moment
to have anita thompson here, from mississippi, because 48 years ago, there were drive-by shootings at headstart programs in her state, and some toloyers were threatening not send their children to headstart. we have come some way, and we have a ways to go. and earlyeadstart childhood education programs were serving a scant 40% of all eligible children. waiting lists or long. -- were long. rising fixed costs and rent, energy. we have almost always operated at the margins because it seems inconceivably -- inconceivable not to spend every available dollar on providing the best quality program for every possible child. when the unthinkable happened and sequestration became the new reality this march, we had little left to cut. you recently saw -- you have likely seen the recent report that over 57,000 fewer children will be served in head start and early head start next year because of the sequester. this is not a small number. numbercrunching thinkers in our team figured out that 57,000 people would fill a football stadium at the university of louisville. they would fill 1900 school m
jackson mississippi, good morning. yes, i am a conservative republican from mississippi. i agree with the doctor earlier. i think obamacare is very bad. it is going to go down naturally. i am not for a government shutdown i am for tying it to and doing asing the conservative republicans will done. i think we ought to way entitlements and electric public and in 2014. i am not for a government shutdown and i am not for obamacare. i am tying it to the debt ceiling. host: that is the strategy as far as speaker boehner is concerned. caller: i think that is what we should do. eastern and central time zones and mountain pacific time zones are the options. the numbers are on your screen, you can call the one that best represents you. for and worth -- foreign affairs released a story in the washington post this morning, talking about a reunion of families on both sides in korea -- calls, this is john from idaho, good morning. i believe that republicans are missing an opportunity right now to win if wehe government and make president obama passed the health care and not give people voucher
. the sad thing when i was in the georgia legislature we used to say thank god for mississippi because mississippi was always worse than georgia. now we have to say thank god for north carolina because north carolina has become the new mississippi. >> you know, brian, let's talk about north carolina. north carolina up until recently was seen as a sort of a bastion of progressism of the south. yet north carolina now is not exactly a bastion of anything progressive. >> no. i think that's right. one of the scary things for people who are committed to civil rights in this country is that the pace of which we have retreated from basic protections. what i'm most concerned about is these legislatures a lot of them in the south and other parts of the country actually take pride in their resistance to responding to the challenges that face people of color, that face the poor, that face the disadvantaged. they are proud of the fact that they are creating barriers to voting. in north carolina there was something called the racial justice act that was design to deal with the horrific disparities w
on to help a student at howard and quote came out for students to go to mississippi because of the work that was going on there. i had seen some -- i had attended a deposition in washington and folk from mississippi and things they had suffered. this elderly man, hartman, talked about what happened on the bus. i was a student. all of the students were coming from all over the country. i was the black student and the student leadership at howard said we have to get there and be there with others. so i went to mississippi that summer of 1964 and i lived with a family. ms.johnson, her daughter was a teenager, june johnson and had been beaten in wynonna, mississippi. june was a strong girl. the family was strong there were about 12 children in the family. they took in three of us. two white girls and myself. host: ruth thanks for the call and thank you for sharing your story from 50 years ago. owen ullmann, we talked about your own participation. walk us through how you arrived here and why you came? guest: my parent has raised me and i'm proud of their values of stressing the importance
, who recently had some heart treatment. let's go to mississippi. laura from ocean springs, mississippi. i am 45 years old. when barack obama talked about education. they discussed how blacks and whites could not go to the same school. thes a graduate from university of south alabama. i was able to graduate from there with a bachelors. >> what did you get your degree in? >> i got my degree in exercise science. work on atrying to masters, but i have been sick. i will have surgery in september. i will try to finish up with a masters in education. >> good luck to you, thank you for joining us. florida, next up. >> how are you doing? listen, i wanted to commend you guys and congratulate you for an awesome broadcast. such a remarkable speech by such a remarkable character. encourage.mber to some of the members of congress commenting about the days activities. here here is senator casey from pennsylvania. this is kay granger of texas. what dreams do you have for your country? the culmination of a movement that began here in montgomery 50 years before. here is california, good evening, stephen
. in texas and mississippi, north carolina and florida, groups are already devising creative ways to make it difficult for minorities, each of us, to vote. in texas, they have already done it. this assault on freedom should be taken as seriously as you have taken anything. any changes to our voting process should be enacted to make voices heard. just simply being able to vote. i have asked the senate judiciary committee to examine these dangerous voting suppression efforts and discuss steps the senate can make to preserve the right of every person to cast a ballot. [applause] on the day the civil rights act was signed into law, president lyndon johnson warned the struggle for equality was not nearly over. here is what he said. "those who founded our country knew that freedom would be secure only if each generation fought." now our generation of americans have been called on to the search of justice. he is sure right. those words are written -- are a reminder to a new generation that freedom must be tended to in order -- for us to grow. [applause] >> ladies and gentlemen, the honorable mit
i was even lower than a working bee. mississippi for the first part of the summer knowing that there was lots of talk about the march on washington, not knowing if it would ever come to be but mississippi was the last of the states where there had been no demonstrations. but not mississippi. halfway through the summer, i got a call saying "it's going to happen, eleanor. and buy yard is going to do it." he said, "come on up if you want to work on the staff." byyard us are on the. states who could have organized that march. >> ifill: what do you mean? >> there were a set of skills that we had no reason to have so nurtured. there had never been a mass march on washington that anyone. there had been all kind ofmarchs march. what would it take to organize such a march with no experience, no precedent to draw from. >> ifill: no social media, no flash mobs. with only telephones and the usual old-fashioned 20th century means of communication. on.l, first it took it took someone -- and i think buyard put it all in one. he had been a pass f.i.s.edworln civil disobedience in leavenwo
her career as a lawyer for the n.a.a.c.p. in mississippi. also here, taylor branch, the historian who has, of course, written four books on dr. king and the civil rights era. his later "the king years" recently out in paperback. and our friend, ben jealous, the professional of the n.a.a.c.p. i want to start with you, marian. when you were there, did you realize at the time the effect that dr. king's speech was going to have? >> yes. and i realized as one of my own-- the hundreds of thousands property we were a transforming element of nonviolent witness that was unprecedented in our history, as you indicated, people expecting violence. here you had a huge, multiracial, multifaith, multigenerational-- i was 24 at the time-- witness -- >> what did you feel like? were you excited? >> i was exhilarated. i felt empowered. i felt connected. it's always good to know that you're not alone and there are all these people coming out saying, "we're committed to making america, america." it strengthened me as i was being trained to go down to mississippi and practice law. a great day. >> schieffer:
as the negro in mississippi cannot vote and the negro in new york believes he has nothing for which to vote. >> there was no way to know then that it would have the impact that it has had. it's just fantastic. >> there's no way in the world we ever believed we'd live long enough to see a black president. >> congratulations, mr. president. >> i cried, because it never occurred to me that i would live long enough to see a black man become president of the united states. >> for a black man in this societies, there's always been this need to be cautious about the way you presented yourself in public, because you could end up like trayvon. i think dr. king let us understand that you still had to take the risk. i love bang black man in america, because it means that there's still hope that things can be changed without mowing down thousands of citizens the way that's happening in other parts of the world. >> it still hurts when other people don't think of you as an american, you're a black american, but you really aren't an american. if the rest of the country never sees us as americans, we'll be
every hill and molehill of mississippi and from every mountain side. . i'm angela, and i didn't think i could quit smoking but chantix helped me do it. i told my doctor i think i'm... i'm ready. [ male announcer ] along with support, chantix (varenicline) is proven to help people quit smoking. it reduces the urge to smoke. i knew that i could smoke for the first 7 days. i knew that i wasn't putting nicotine back into my body to try to quit. [ male announcer ] some people had changes in behavior, thinking or mood, hostility, agitation, depressed mood and suicidal thoughts or actions while taking or after stopping chantix. if you notice any of these, stop chantix and call your doctor right away. tell your doctor about any history of mental health problems, which could get worse while taking chantix. don't take chantix if you've had a serious allergic or skin reaction to it. if you develop these, sp chantix and see your doctor right away as some can be life-threatening. tell your doctor if you have a history of heart or blood vessel problems, or if you develop new or worse symptoms. get me
of mississippi arrived in tokyo on august 28th to commemorate the historic day. the message he brought is let freedom ring. >> he played a spiritual song he has been listening to since the childhood. they helped them during the struggles. >> in the words of doctor martin luther king,jr. equality for everyone. freedom. you remind me that i have to be conscious of the inequality that does exist in the world. i don't know how much longer it's going to take with another 50 years or what. we have to keep the march going. >> u.s. secretary of defense chuck hagel joined the minster defense leaders in the southeast asian nations. it contains a number of security challenges including disputes over the south china sea. the agenda was overtaken by events in the mideast and talk of possible u.s. military action against syria. the obama administration identified the asia pacific region as an area of importance for the united states. hagel attended the asean defense minster's meeting on wednesday. he will join a wider discussion on thursday when minsters from china, japan and other countries join their cou
was held to honor his dream. ezra brown is a saxophone player from the state of mississippi. he arrived in tokyo on august 28th to commemorate the historic day. the message he brought with him? let freedom ring. ♪ brown played a traditional spiritual song that he has been listening to since his childhood. it's a piece that people in the civil rights movement sang in church to help them during their struggle. >> in the words of dr. martin luther king jr., let's keep in our heart and our mind and our soul about universal peace, equality for everyone, freedom. ♪ >> well, it reminds me that i have to be conscious of the inequalities that does exist now in the world. >> i don't know how much longer it's going to take, if it's going to be another 50 years or what, but we still got a ways to go, you know, and we still got to kind of keep the march going. ♪ >>> a series of bombs have exploded in shia muslim areas in and around the iraqi capital baghdad. the blasts killed at least 40 people. another 160 were wounded. iraqi authorities say insurgents detonated bombs in 14 places including p
she wore for the 1963 march. she remembered the opposite progression in her native mississippi. >> coming no north for the marc, and the federal government on the conditions down south did, in fact, give us th the bear brd base of support. >> crediting the civil rights movement for gay lesbian rights, yet there was the recognition of unmet goals of 19th 63. >> reporter: 50 years later these marchs are repeating the same demands economic and political. jobs and justice. president obama acknowledg acknd progress had stalled. those inequities would have to be tackled in every level of society. >> the successful man who doesn't have to but pays his workers a fair wage and then offers a shot to a man, an ex-con, who may be down on his luck. he's marching. >> reporter: he talked about the politics of division that polarize the government. >> gay rights have been critical of coca-cola sponsorship of the olympics in russia. it accuses coca-cola of supporting hate because of its support of olympics. >> we go to the world's oldest film festival. >> reporter: the high octane glamour of th
rather have a brand new state of the art pipeline traveling down the margin mississippi and on the trunk to be cut tanker cars and trucks. >> host: there was a story that was reported by the newspaper saying that the decision would likely be until the inspector general looked at the investigation of the conflict of interest complete and the inspector general looked at the complete of the environmental research mismanagement that prepares the environmental impact statement on the keystone xl on the central conflict. >> guest: it's not a new story. that came out and was thoroughly investigated. my understanding is that there were no conflicts found. what you are starting to see frankly is the recycling of a lot of defense. keep in mind, that executive order that was put in place that governs this entire process was put in place to expedite the cross border transportation facilities. instead of expediting it, this environment environmental impact we could have built the empire state building five times buy now. we have completed world war ii in less time. so again as an institutional list a
-american. in the crowd jesse jackson and mayoron berry.ry. >> let freedom ring from mississippi from every mountainside. >> while images resonate fromm that day in august when dr. king gave his iconic smeech organizers and participants wila hoping it will be a catalyst for more advances on the job front, immigration reform, more advances with voting rights. >> we can't improve our voting laws. >> we have to get the changes on capitol hill. it's time for that to end, ladies and gentlemen.en. i ask you to join with me in that fight! [cheers and applause]laus >> realizing how far we've come as a nation from the segregated buses, lunch counters and schools from the 50s and 60s you have only to talk about -- >> it was a lot of racism. blacks weren't allowed with the whites. they barely could do anything.tn >> it's important to me because martin luther king was like a mentor to me like coming up in school and i like -- like him ii have a dream that some day we all can come together evenve though we're not all the way there but on our way. >> that was fox 5 karen grayra houston reporting. this week's events i
-american. in the crow crowd, jesse jackson and mare onbarry. >> let freedom ring from every hill of mississippi. >>reporter: while images still resonate in the date in august when he gave his speech. anniversary organizers and participants hope it will be a catalyst for advances on the job front and more advances catalyst for advances on the job front and more advances with voting rights -- -- >>>reporter: realized how far we have come as a nation from segregated buses, lunch counters from the 50s and 60s, you have only to talk to people who were not alive or only toddlers when king marched in washington. >> alot of racism, blacks weren't allowed with the whites and they barely could do anything. >> it's important to me because dr. martin luther king was like a mentor to me, coming up in school and i like him, i have a dream that some day we all could come together -fplgt/ we are not all the way there, but we are on our way. >>reporter: this week's events include a march on saturday that retraces the 196 3 march for jobs and freedom. there will be a march on the day of the actual anniversary
person and -- i'm from mississippi. and my parents have worked aggressively in the civil rights movement. my father, reverend james, actually integrated schools in in mississippi. we had the chain gangs before my father got involved in criminal is.tice system. it takes a village to raise a child. i'm using a hillary clinton quote. even though we have come a long way from 50 years ago, we have a long way to go. as for role models, parents should be role models. teachers should be role models and schools should be role models for children. not just one person. >> thank you, both for your thoughts on this historic day as we take a look back and forward. now let's switch gears and let's talk as we mentioned in the intro about -- the affordable care act and the problems that seem to continue to plague obama care. so, debbie, what are your thoughts on the latest announcements made by the university of virginia and made by ups and they won't cover spouses and you can get coverage other places and then -- also, delta comment being the cost that they will approve as a result. >> i think people ar
father and sister said we cannot rest and be satisfied as long as black folk in mississippi could not vote. and those in new york believed that they had nothing for which to vote. today the united states supreme court, having recently eviscerating the voting rights act and with numerous states clamoring to legislatively codify voting suppression measures, not only must we not be satisfied but we must fight back boldly. too many of our unknown heroes and sheroes fought, bled and died for us to have the precious rights of vote. for us to now sit back and timidly allow our franchise to be taken away or diminished, we must not rest until the congress of the united states restores the voting rights act protections discarded by a supreme court blind to the blatant tests of the black folks. paramount to martin luther king jr.'s fervent dream was the commitment that african americans gain full economic opportunity and not be confined to basic mobility forward from a smaller ghetto to a larger one. today, with 12% unemployment rates in the african american community and 38% of all children
and particularly the right to vote to people of color in mississippi. i hadn't -- i didn't know him well but i had covered him on a fairly regular basis. and when he was assassinated in an especially cowardly and despicable way, i was tipped to the shooting and we were the first people covering it, news people at the scene. so i knew medgar and had met his family before. i had met his brother at the airport and we formed a bond which lasts to this day, i'm happy to say. i've always had a bond with medgar's family partly because i know firsthand, i bore witness to how heroic his efforts were to bring freedom and justice in the darkest corners of mississippi at a bad time. by the way, it's little noted nor very often remembered that the march on washington for which dr. king rightly became so famous was originally designed to be primarily a march in memory of medgar evers and what had happened to medgar evers. that got lost in the shuffle of the day as it developed and has been lost in the history and reporting since that time. >> well, dan rather, you have provided so much detail and illumination a
on the south. i said, if we do not see meaningful progress, we will march through virginia, through mississippi and several other places. do your a member? >> i remember all that. i was donated to the march on washington committee and my task was distributing john's speech, the original speech to murmurs of the press who were seated down below lincoln, still above on the steps. i passed out these copies of john's speech and pointed out to them, that john would be the only speaker speaking that day who talk about black people instead of negroes or colored people as was the fashion. i thought and we thought that this demonstrated how militant we were and how different we were and better and superior we were from the other civil rights organizations. none of the reporters made any objection. [laughter] >> what did you mean by militant? >> i meant aggressive. nothing harmful or violent. i have always been upset by people who say, they are so militant. they equate it with violence. it is not necessarily equitable with violence. it just means somebody is it aggressively in pursuit of his ideas. we th
of brotherhood. i have a dream that one day even the state of mississippi, a state sweltering with the heat of injustice, sweltering with the heat of oppression, will be transformed into an oasis of freedom and justice. i have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character. i have a dream today. i have a dream that one day the -- down in alabama, with its vicious racists, with its governor have his lips dripping with the words of interposition and nullification, one day down in alabama little black boys and black girls will be able to join hands with little white boys and white girls as sisters and brothers. i have a dream today. i have a dream that one day every valley shall be exalted, every hill and mountain shall be made low, the rough places will be made plain, and the crooked places will be made straight, and the glory of the lord shall be revealed and all flesh shall see it together. this is our hope. this is the faith that i go back to the south with. with this faith w
general. i'm from mississippi and my father worked heavily to dissect regate schools in mississippi. my mother didn't have a black high school. my father had to build it. now we have education and equality. but is there a level playing field today? >> as the reverend jesse jackson pointed out today, he said that african americans are less equal -- >> we have the first black president. but unemployment in the black community is on the increase. >> 2.6% black unemployment. versus 6.6% for whites. >> first of all, it's not just a black problem and those indices are for the black community but there are disparities in other communities, also. having said that, i think all of us have to get engaged. it's not just a government problem. one of the key points that president obama mentioned today. everybody has to get involved. when children are born out of wedlock that's not the government. some individuals need to hear what's happening at their churches. men and women need to take responsibility. in all communities. >> he's right, the reverend is right from the standpoint government is suppose
for the head start association. our office is located is -- our office is located in jackson, mississippi. i've been with head start since 1980 and am excited to be here today to share some of our concerns about sequestration. >> martha coven, associate director for education and community and labor at the office of management and budget which is part of the executive office of the president. so we on behalf of the present over to the budget for the number of federal agencies including education. the ministry for children and families at hhs where the head start progress. >> i'm the director of policy and planning at the office of head start within the department of health and human services and the start of the early childhood career 20 years ago in head start agency in brooklyn. so i'm really happy to be here today. >> i'm sharon parrott from the center on budget and policy priorities were on the vice president's budget policy and economic opportunity. this is the second go-round for me at the center on budget and just prior to returning in november i worked for secretaries and police at t
teenager on vacation in mississippi. is it is a new day, but the day isn't over. the struggle for the civil rights for civil rights, social justice, and economic opportunity to man our engagement and our voice. to realize fully our dream we must raise our voices and take action. we must lift our voices to challenge government and our community and neighbors to be better. we must lift our voices for wages that enable families to take care of themselves, for a health care system that erases disparities, for communities and homes without violence, for clean air and water to protect our environment for future generations, and for a just justice system. we must lift our voice for the value of our boat and have our votes counted without interference. as we stand here today, dr. king would know, and john lewis certainly knows, that today is not just a commemoration or celebration. it is a call to action for the work remains undone in the communities that remain unchanged. our foremothers and forefathers 50 years ago closed the books on the last century. well, when the book closes on the 21st centu
? guest: it is certainly a valid point. host: let's try charles from mississippi. republican line. hi, there. caller: my question to the lady would be that i noticed during this family vacation with the president's family was gone to martha's vineyard, they left bo the dog at home, and sent a marine helicopter to bring it back at a cost of over $300,000. i would like to know why that is not talked about more. host: more about the president there. guest: i do not know where the facts are coming from, but i find that intriguing, and if that is true, that is certainly something reuters would want to know about and write about. i have a long record in journalism looking into the -- exactly that kind of thing. i will take that note home with me. host: a couple of callers are mentioning the white house, and twitter, the same thing. we have been talking about rules congress wrote for itself for travel. you have a sense of how the white house works in this area -- how he decides where they are going? is anyone oversee those decisions because we are hearing it from callers? guest: i do not kno
hill of mississippi. there was one place that dr. king did not mention, about which he later spoke of. that was the district of columbia. that is because full freedom and democracy were and are still denied to the people who quite literally live within the site of the capitol dome. our city is home to more residents than the state of vermont and wyoming. but we have no voting representative in our own congress. we pay more than $3.5 billion a year in federal taxes. we don't even get the final say over how we spend our own locally raised money. we send our sons and daughters to fight for democracy overseas, but don't get to practice it fully here at home. today, as we remember those who gave so much have a century ago to extend the blessings of liberty to all americans, i implore and hope that all of you will stand with me when i say that we must let freedom ring from mount saint alban, where rises the majestic national cathedral. we must let freedom ring from the bridges of anacostia. we must let freedom ring from capitol hill itself, until all of the residents of the very seat of our
songs. ?let freedom ring." from stone mountain of georgia, and every hill of mississippi. there was one place that dr. king did not mention, about which he later spoke of. that was the district of columbia. that is because full freedom and democracy were and are still denied to the people who quite literally live within the site of the capitol dome. our city is home to more residents than the state of vermont and wyoming. but we have no voting representative in our own congress. we pay more than $3.5 billion a year in federal taxes. we don't even get the final say over how we spend our own locally raised money. we send our sons and daughters to fight for democracy overseas, but don't get to practice it fully here at home. today, as we remember those who gave so much have a century ago to extend the blessings of liberty to all americans, i implore and hope that all of you will stand with me when i say that we must let freedom ring from mount saint alban, where rises the majestic national cathedral. we must let freedom ring from the bridges of anacostia. we must let freedom ring from capi
. in wasn't mississippi. it was not too-- it was a different kind of state. this is punitive. it's vindictive. it's vengeful. it's just a way-- there is no evidence of any voter fraud of anybody using somebody else's identification to vote. if there were, you could say it's an over-reaction. this is a created fabrication to basically discourage, if not make impossible, voting by groups, people who belong to groups who don't ordinarily vote republican, who vote democratic. 56% of the people in north carolina voted on election day. early voting rather. there will be no early voting. it's just an attempt to make it difficult to vote. >> i guess i sort of agree. i would say two things. first, one of the great stories in american history and in the south in the last couple of years, couple of decades, is the gradual empowerment and franchisement of african americans. i think one's basic attitude is you don't want to be on the wrong side of that story. so i do think if you're supporting this, you're putting yourself on the wrong side of that story. having said that, do i think it's a h
on the death list in mississippi and he took it upon himself to train our children what to do in case they heard gunfire. that's exactly what they did that night. each other helped each other to the bathroom to get in the tub and my screams stopped them from completing that hiding point. but we knew, you live with death threats constantly and you adapt your life to that. you might argue, but you don't leave without the embrace. you might become angry with things that are happening around you, but it's a time of support. it's a time of pulling people together. and during that time, we had the ages divided. there were the young people and there were the older people. those in the middle were more or less teachers who were a little afraid to speak up and stand out. medgarr stood alone in that battle. he did have supporters, of course, but he was the point person and it was extremely difficult for us as a family to live with that. but you lived as though every day was going to be your last together. it sounds a little sad but that's the way it was. >> one of your themes in your speech on
secretary of the naacp in mississippi, civil rights leader medgar evers organized voter registration efforts. evers was assassinated in 1963 mere months before the march on washington. since then as a civil rights activist and former executive director of the naacp, his widow myrlie evers williams has carried on his legacy. she joins me sitting rights here, along with joy reid, manager the grio and msnbc contributor. i have been chasing after you, joy. i see you everywhere but here. now i've got you here finally. you are very smart about this stuff. and i know you're from the younger generation. i want to get myrlie on this too. i want you to react to this. a couple of things. it's not just minority voters that benefit from traditional voting patterns. the easier way to vote, younger people have a harder time budgeting their time. they just do for whatever reason. the easier it is to vote, the more are going to vote. african-american voters, many don't have money to have a car, don't have a driver's license, may be older living in row houses like i used to live as a kid, and they basically h
, in the delta of mississippi. >> and there was a line about marching through the south like sherman which had to be exercised before you delivered, isn't that right? >> it is true that i did have a line in the speech that said in effect if we do not see meaningful progress here today, the day will come, when we will not confine our marching in washington. but we may be forced to march through the south the way sherman did nonviolently. the archbishop of washington -- if i did not delete that part of the speech. and we had some discussion the evening before the march. and later someone came to me and said how is your speech and i said, we have to make some changes you have to delete something. and i remember having a discussion with mr. wilkins and i said roy, this is my speech. and i'm speaking for the young people. speaking people fresh from jails. and he sort of dropped it. and randolph and martin luther king, jr. came to me. and we met right on the side of mr. lincoln. the music was already playing. someone had a portable;÷ñ÷ typewriter. and dr. king said to me, john that doesn't sound
, mississippi. and many may relate to that. the death of those three civil rights workers there. but you also relate the fact that there was many others all across the great state of mississippi and in other southern states who sacrificed as well. and so share some of your opinions on the ideal of galvanizing the college youth. >> we followed the tradition as college students of young people and college students all over the world. when you talk about changing the social order, it is usually the young people, the young, educated people who will generally spear that particular change. -- spearhead that particular change. so we followed that same historical tradition. when, we know about the three civil rights workers who were murdered, but during that same period from june, i think, through september a total of 7 other blacks -- 27 other blacks, young black males, were murdered in mississippi. i related the you the story of two students at alcorn college who were just coming back to the campus from downtown, and two carloads of klansmen kidnapped them, and they found be their bodies, i think,
>>> cierntos de perros pitbull. en texas, alabama, mississippi y georgia. confiscaron 350 canes, algunos malheridos desnutridos se leve yan las costillas. incautaron medio millÓn de dÓlares provenientes de las apuestas relacionadas a las peleas, de ser encontrados culpables, los sospechosos pueden enfrentar penas de 5 aÑos de cÁrcel. la muerte masiva de la costa atlÁntica de estados unidos. han aparecido 500 delfines y se han muerto agonizando ba radivan ya costa de new york. y estos delfines, estaban infectados por un virus parecido al sarampiÓn. y los delfines causa lesiones en la piel infecciones y pulmonÍa. el paro agrÍcola en colombia. un paro que lleva casi mÁs de una semana. >>> y comenzaron las negociaciones en un intento por solucionar la crisis, con agricultores cafeteros y le chers maribel osorio tiene mÁs. >>> bloqueados y en caos, sacudidos por por las protestas de los agricultores que trabajan apero deuda. >>> la producciÓn de leche no da lo que se esperaba, los in zooms son poso aco demasiado costosos para la producciÓn de papa. >>> al cumplirsemen dÍas de par
till was found in mississippi. >>> an act of honesty caught on tape in northern new jersey. buddy's small lot was closed when a surveillance video shows four teens entering the store. instead of making off with batteries and ear phones, they leave carbon the counter, including sales tax. >> i think it's terrific that there are still people out there that have moral character not to do the wrong thing and they easily could. >> it seems a malfunctioning door lock is to blame after employees had gone home. the owners went looking for the young men to give them gift certificates, and they found them. four college football players who thank their parents. >> everything pays off. like good parenthoods and being around and showing me the ups and downs of things. you know, they showed me the right way to go. >> great group of guys there. >>> we do have some new photos of the man hunt of alleged boston bomber, dzhokhar tsarnaev. the photos show the sheer amount of manpower called in to find the suspect. the most gripping photos are from the standoff between police and tsarnaev showing him
, but also from stone mountain of georgia and every hill and mow hill of mississippi. there was one place that dr. king didn't mention in that speech but about which he later spoke of forcefully and that was the district of columbia. that's because, that's because full freedom and democracy were and are still denied to the people who quite literally live within the sight of the capital dome. we have no voting representative in our own congress. we pay more than $3.5 billion. $3.5 billion a year in federal taxes. but don't even get the final say in how we spend the money. and we send our sons and our daughters to fight for democracy overseas but don't get to practice it fully here at home. so today, as we remember those who gave so much a century ago to extend the blessings of liberty to all americans, i hope that all of you will stand with me when i say what we must let freedom ring from mt. st. al bon where rises the majestic national cathedral. and most of all, we must let freedom ring from capitol hill itself, until all of the residents of the very seat of our great democracy are truly
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